Advertisement

Development of a high-fidelity minimally invasive mitral valve surgery simulator

  • Peyman Sardari Nia
    Correspondence
    Address for reprints: Peyman Sardari Nia, MD, PhD, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC+), P. Debyelaan 25, 6229HX Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Affiliations
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands

    Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences (FHML), Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Search for articles by this author
  • Jean H.T. Daemen
    Affiliations
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Search for articles by this author
  • Jos G. Maessen
    Affiliations
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands

    Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences (FHML), Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Search for articles by this author
Open ArchivePublished:September 29, 2018DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jtcvs.2018.09.014

      Abstract

      Objectives

      The aim of this study was to develop a high-fidelity minimally invasive mitral valve surgery (MIMVS) simulator.

      Methods

      The process of industrial serial design was applied based on pre-set requirements, acquired by interviewing experienced mitral surgeons. A thoracic torso with endoscopic and robotic access and disposable silicone mitral valve apparatus with a feedback system was developed. The feedback system was based on 4 cameras around the silicone valve and an edge detection algorithm to calculate suture depth and width. Validity of simulator measurements was assessed by comparing simulator-generated values with measurements done manually on 3-dimensional reconstructed micro-computed tomography scan of the same sutures. Independent surgeons tested the simulator between 2014 and 2018, whereupon an evaluation was done through a questionnaire.

      Results

      The feedback system was able to provide width and depth measurements, which were subsequently scored by comparison to pre-set target values. Depth did not significantly differ between simulator and micro-computed tomography scan measurements (P = .139). Width differed significantly (P = .001), whereupon a significant regression equation was found (P < .0001) to calibrate the simulator. After calibration, no significant difference was found (P = .865). In total, 99 surgeons tested the simulator and more than agreed with the statements that the simulator is a good method for training MIMVS, and that the mitral valve and suture placement looked and felt realistic.

      Conclusions

      We successfully developed a high-fidelity MIMVS simulator for endoscopic and robotic approaches. The simulator provides a platform to train skills in an objective and reproducible manner. Future studies are needed to provide evidence for its application in training surgeons.

      Key Words

      Abbreviations and Acronyms:

      3D (3-dimensional), CT (computed tomography), MIMVS (minimally invasive mitral valve surgery)
      Figure thumbnail fx1
      The developed, high-fidelity minimally invasive mitral valve simulator.
      This study demonstrates the development of a high-fidelity minimally invasive mitral valve simulator that provides a reproducible and objective platform to train surgical skills.
      This high-fidelity simulator provides residents and surgeons with a reproducible and objective platform to acquire the necessary skills for minimally invasive mitral valve surgery (MIMVS), shorten the learning curve, get acquainted to new techniques, simulate complex cases, and provide objectification of skill assessment, all of which may subsequently enhance the reproducibility, safety, and efficacy of MIMVS.
      See Commentaries on pages 1575 and page 1576.
      Mitral valve repair has been well established to be a desirable and superior to replacement for degenerative mitral regurgitation.
      • Shuhaiber J.
      • Anderson R.J.
      Meta-analysis of clinical outcomes following surgical mitral valve repair or replacement.
      • Galloway A.
      • Colvin S.
      • Baumann F.
      • Grossi E.
      • Ribakove G.
      • Harty S.
      • et al.
      A comparison of mitral valve reconstruction with mitral valve replacement: intermediate-term results.
      Nevertheless, surgical volume is mandatory to achieve proficiency and allow concurrent successive repair. This is best demonstrated by the observation that surgeon-specific mitral valve volume is independently associated with a greater probability of repair.
      • Bolling S.F.
      • Li S.
      • O'brien S.M.
      • Brennan J.M.
      • Prager R.L.
      • Gammie J.S.
      Predictors of mitral valve repair: clinical and surgeon factors.
      Moreover, complex, minimally invasive techniques such as minimally invasive mitral valve repair require between 75 and 125 operations to overcome the associated learning curve.
      • Holzhey D.M.
      • Seeburger J.
      • Misfeld M.
      • Borger M.A.
      • Mohr F.W.
      Learning minimally invasive mitral valve surgery: a cumulative sum sequential probability analysis of 3895 operations from a single high volume center.
      In addition, with the current limited working hours and rapid introduction of new surgical techniques, training is likely to move outside the operating theater, where new educational tools could be used to overcome the learning curve. Simulators can provide a full-spectrum solution for these dilemmas. Simulation-based training may subsequently allow training of residents to achieve proficiency in basic skills within shorter training periods, whereas practicing surgeons can be swiftly trained in novel techniques.
      Simulator training has been well described for laparoscopic surgery and proven to be effective by reducing the learning curve of in vivo procedures.
      • Aggarwal R.
      • Ward J.
      • Balasundaram I.
      • Sains P.
      • Athanasiou T.
      • Darzi A.
      Proving the effectiveness of virtual reality simulation for training in laparoscopic surgery.
      Although high-level evidence of simulator training is mainly reported for laparoscopic surgery, the basic idea of simulation training and its effectiveness remains. In cardiothoracic surgery, simulation-based training has been proposed as an approach to augment proficiency in basic skills and new techniques.
      • Carpenter A.J.
      • Yang S.C.
      • Uhlig P.N.
      • Colson Y.L.
      Envisioning simulation in the future of thoracic surgical education.
      • Hicks G.L.
      • Brown J.W.
      • Calhoon J.H.
      • Merrill W.H.
      You never know unless you try.
      • Feins R.H.
      Expert commentary: cardiothoracic surgical simulation.
      Two systematic reviews reported that such simulation-acquired surgical skills are transferable to the operative setting,
      • Dawe S.R.
      • Windsor J.A.
      • Broeders J.A.
      • Cregan P.C.
      • Hewett P.J.
      • Maddern G.J.
      A systematic review of surgical skills transfer after simulation-based training: laparoscopic cholecystectomy and endoscopy.
      • Sturm L.P.
      • Windsor J.A.
      • Cosman P.H.
      • Cregan P.
      • Hewett P.J.
      • Maddern G.J.
      A systematic review of skills transfer after surgical simulation training.
      which may consequently enhance surgical performance.
      Currently, several mitral valve surgery simulators and training models have been described to facilitate in this need.
      • Joyce D.L.
      • Dhillon T.S.
      • Caffarelli A.D.
      • Joyce D.D.
      • Tsirigotis D.N.
      • Burdon T.A.
      • et al.
      Simulation and skills training in mitral valve surgery.
      • Verberkmoes N.J.
      • Verberkmoes-Broeders E.M.P.C.
      A novel low-fidelity simulator for both mitral valve and tricuspid valve surgery: the surgical skills trainer for classic open and minimally invasive techniques.
      • Hossien A.
      Low-fidelity simulation of mitral valve surgery: simple and effective trainer.
      • Greenhouse D.G.
      • Grossi E.A.
      • Dellis S.
      • Park J.
      • Yaffee D.W.
      • DeAnda Jr., A.
      • et al.
      Assessment of a mitral valve replacement skills trainer: a simplified, low-cost approach.
      • The Chamberlain Group
      New Mitral Valve Prolapse Trainer.
      Of these, only Verberkmoes and Verberkmoes-Broeders
      • Verberkmoes N.J.
      • Verberkmoes-Broeders E.M.P.C.
      A novel low-fidelity simulator for both mitral valve and tricuspid valve surgery: the surgical skills trainer for classic open and minimally invasive techniques.
      reported the usability of their simulator for endoscopic minimally invasive mitral valve surgery (MIMVS). In addition, all of the aforementioned studies reported the use of low-fidelity simulators and/or models that can be seen as a black box without feedback. In comparison, a high-fidelity simulator may provide objective, real-time, and reproducible feedback, which can be used to guide skills development and assess the level of proficiency. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the development of a high-fidelity minimally invasive mitral valve simulator that provides real-time feedback and a reproducible platform for the training of surgical skills in a repeated and objective manner.

      Methodology

      Simulator development was performed according to the concept of serial industrial design. The first step includes a problem and function analysis in which simulator requirements are analyzed and summed. followed by prototype development. This prototype is then tested by experts in the field to direct improvements and changes for its final version. Subsequent to production of the actual simulator, it is important to assess whether simulator provided measurements are accurate (ie, does it measure what it has to measure), performed by calibration and validation. The final, most critical step focuses on determining the simulator's added value to traditional training methods. This study directs its focus towards the first two steps. Research ethics board approval was waived, as this study did not incorporate patient data.

      Requirements

      Simulator requirements were obtained by interviewing experienced mitral valve surgeons and by reducing the endoscopic minimally invasive mitral valve repair procedure to its essential components. The resulting list of requirements and their rationale is shown in Table 1.
      Table 1Simulator requirements and their rationale
      RequirementRationale
      TransportableThe simulator must contain a manageable size for easy transport and storage.
      Multiple repair possibilitiesA left ventricular model with papillary muscles, mitral valve, and left atrial model should be created to allow simulation of different repair techniques (eg, placement of neochordae or an annuloplasty ring).
      Realistic suturing experienceTo facilitate a true suturing experience, manufactured models should mimic in vivo tissue properties.
      ReusableAs simulation requires suture placement, models should be reusable, easily replicable, and replaceable.
      Realistic appearanceTo remain close to the in vivo anatomical dimensions, 1:1 models must be created. In addition, to provide a lifelike appearance, a close-to-nature thoracic representation with MIMVS access port should cover the simulator. The created mitral models should be accurately positioned within the simulator to mimic its in vivo angulation and 3-dimensional position.
      FeedbackObjective and real-time feedback about suture depth and suture width is required to provide a direct learning experience. By this method, the end-user will be able to develop and objectively assess their MIMVS skills. Subsequently, diminishing their associated learning curve. Generated feedback could also provide a platform for uniform skill's assessment.
      User interfaceA user interface that allows the user to pre-set the target suture depth and with before any suturing should be created. The user interface should additionally provide objective feedback regarding each suture attempt, get scoring regarding the exercise and be able to visualize the suture track.
      Multiple surgical approachesThe simulator should be designed as such that one could train minimally invasive mitral valve surgery through direct vision, endoscopic approach, and robotic-assistance.
      Access difficultyThe core of the simulator (mitral valve apparatus) should be moveable to mimic the access difficulty.
      MIMVS, Minimally invasive mitral valve surgery.

      Simulator Development

      Prototype

      Before production of the actual simulator, a prototype was developed based on preset requirements.

      Models

      The geometry of left-sided heart structures can substantially differ among individuals with mitral regurgitation by which no known model is able to resemble all mitral regurgitation variations. Therefore, a characteristic regurgitation model with slightly dilated atrium and mitral valve was chosen. Dimensions were retrieved from the available literature.
      • Khabbaz K.R.
      • Mahmood F.
      • Shakil O.
      • Warraich H.J.
      • Gorman J.H.
      • Gorman R.C.
      • et al.
      Dynamic 3-dimensional echocardiographic assessment of mitral annular geometry in patients with functional mitral regurgitation.
      • Maceira A.M.
      • Cosín-Sales J.
      • Roughton M.
      • Prasad S.K.
      • Pennell D.J.
      Reference left atrial dimensions and volumes by steady state free precession cardiovascular magnetic resonance.
      • Lam J.
      • Ranganathan N.
      • Wigle E.
      • Silver M.
      Morphology of the human mitral valve: I. Chordae tendineae: a new classification.
      • Ryan L.P.
      • Jackson B.M.
      • Enomoto Y.
      • Parish L.
      • Plappert T.J.
      • John-Sutton M.G.S.
      • et al.
      Description of regional mitral annular nonplanarity in healthy human subjects: a novel methodology.
      The mitral valve, left atrium, and left ventricle with papillary muscles models were subsequently created from dedicated polyurethane-foam, which allows submillimeter precision (Figure 1, A and B). Positive foam models were then used for negative mold production, whereas molds were cast with a dedicated mix of silicones. Silicone for the mitral valve should provide a true-to-nature suturing experience while remaining glass-like transparency and maintaining a distinct level of toughness to prevent the silicone from tearing on suture placement. After multiple tests and third-party consultations, a weight-based silicone mixture of Sorta-Clear 18 (Smooth On Inc, Easton, Pa) and Slacker (Smooth-On Inc, Macungie, Pa) was chosen and molds were cast. The mitral valve was cast in fully transparent silicone, whereas ventricle and atrial models were cast in tissue-pink silicone after addition of a silicone dye. Inner geometry of the mitral model was subsequently colored by hand to depict atrial (pink) and valvular tissue (white) (Figure 1, C).
      Figure thumbnail gr1
      Figure 1Mitral valve apparatus models. A, Polyurethane-foam model of the left ventricle with papillary muscles. B, Polyurethane-foam mitral valve model. C, Prototype of the silicone-casted mitral valve. D, Final version of the silicone-casted mitral valve model.

      Feedback system

      A hollow, aluminum housing was created as a basis for the feedback system and to fit the silicone models. Four cutouts were made in the housing's straight sides (90° apart) to fit 4 high-resolution cameras (XIMEA GmbH, Münster, Germany). Resolution of the cameras was 1.3 megapixels (1280 × 1024 pixels) at 60 frames per second (Figure 2, A and B).
      Figure thumbnail gr2
      Figure 2Prototype of the high-fidelity minimally invasive mitral valve simulator. A and B, Feedback system with mounted silicone models. C and D, Assembled prototype simulator.
      To be able to detect and measure depth of sutures, a software algorithm and graphical user interface was developed in MATLAB (Release 2015b, The MathWorks Inc, Natick, Mass). This optical analysis algorithm initially differentiates between new and already placed sutures by subtracting a reference (ie, background) image. The algorithm is subsequently able to automatically weigh the camera acquisition in which the newly placed suture can best be seen. To detect suture depth, an edge detection algorithm with high signal-to-noise ratio was used. Following proper edge detection, a binary image was created from which suture depth was calculated in pixels and converted to millimeters (Figure 3). Calculated depth was provided as on-screen feedback using a graphical user interface.
      Figure thumbnail gr3
      Figure 3The feedback algorithm. From left to right: Camera acquisition of a suture that was placed in the silicone mitral valve model. Edge-detected suture by the feedback algorithm. Final binary image from the algorithm, from which the depth and width were calculated.

      Thoracic model

      A thoracic representation with endoscopic access port was added to provide a lifelike appearance (Figure 2, C and D). A 4-cm access port was created at the level comparable with the fourth intercostal space. In this way, the simulator is able to closely mimic MIMVS, given the unique surgeon's angle of view and working space for long-shafted instruments. It is known that more-experienced surgeons use smaller ports; however, to be able to provide simulation for the full range of users, a 4-cm port was created. Nevertheless, to simulate more difficult procedures, one may partially tape the access port. Finally, a camera and white LED lightning strips were mounted inside the thoracic cavity to provide and mimic the on-screen endoscopic view. In this way, no external endoscopic station is required for simulation.
      The feedback system and thorax model were subsequently mounted on a mobile table to allow easy transport. Target position of the feedback system was derived from an in-house database of computed tomography (CT) images of patients with a right-sided pneumothorax, as is induced during MIMVS. As a last step, all components were assembled, including a computer and monitor to run the feedback-algorithm, provide a real-time on-screen endoscopic view, and provide suture feedback. The resulting prototype simulator is seen in Figure 2.

      From prototype to actual simulator

      Prototype testing and evaluation was performed by experienced cardiothoracic surgeons. Subsequently, adjustments were made. To ease physical stress and provide a proper ergonomic position, the simulator was mounted on a height-adjustable table. In addition, a set of adjustable screws and bolts were added to permit adjustment of the mitral housing's position. This adjustable configuration allows simulation of different levels of complexity (eg, increased access port – mitral valve distance).
      Software was initially developed using MATLAB (Release 2015b, The MathWorks Inc). However, for the second generation, software was written in C++ to allow license-free distribution and the feedback algorithm was sped up to provide direct, real-time feedback. In addition, several novel features were added to the fundamental feedback algorithm and user interface. An algorithm to measure suture width was added, alongside the ability for users to define the intended suture depth and width and its allowable margin of error (Figure 4, A). Entered values are used by the system to provide value-based, objective feedback (eg, “suture width spot on”) and calculate an overall score (Figure 4, B). In addition, users are given the ability to login using their self-chosen user credentials and track their progression over time (Figure 4, C).
      Figure thumbnail gr4
      Figure 4User interfaces of the feedback-system. A and B, Graphical user interface that provides on-screen feedback, the endoscopic view and allows the user to define the margin of error. C, Log-in screen. D, Internal camera view of the feedback system from which width and depth are measured.
      To be able to simulate different minimally invasive approaches, 3 trocar-like ports were added to the thoracic model (Figure 5, A and B). These provide the ability to simulate robotic mitral valve repair by for example using the Da Vinci surgical system. However, because most robotic systems possess their own lightning source and camera, a switch was added to the LED strips and the endoscopic view camera was made detachable using magnets. To adhere to the replicability and replaceability of simulator components, the feedback system's housing was produced in more robust manner (Figure 5, C and D) and a 3-dimensional (3D) printed, hard-plastic ventricle model with magnetic, silicone papillary muscles was created (Figure 5, E and F). These papillary muscles can subsequently be replaced when worn out without having to replace the entire left ventricle. In addition, an aluminum mitral valve model mold was manufactured, which provides greater-quality silicone castings (Figure 1, D) and allows inexhaustible reproduction.
      Figure thumbnail gr5
      Figure 5Final version of the simulator. A and B, View of the assembled simulator. C and D, Feedback system. E and F, Magnetic, silicone papillary muscles mounted in the 3-dimensional–printed ventricle.

      Calibration and Validation of Simulator Measurements

      Different silicone valves were mounted into the simulator, whereupon simple interrupted annuloplasty sutures were placed. After recording simulator-measurements, the silicone valves including placed sutures were placed into a micro-CT-scanner. Acquired CT scans were exported to a dedicated 3D software system for image processing (Vesalius3D; PS-Medtech, Amsterdam, The Netherlands). Subsequently, 3D-reconstructed models of each silicone valve were created and suture depth and width was measured. Validity of simulator's measurements (ie, depth and width) was assessed by comparing simulator-generated values to those acquired through micro-CT acquisitions.

      Evaluation by independent operators

      Independent surgeons were given multiple opportunities to test the simulator during various European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery events and courses in the period from 2014 to 2018. Following simulator-training, surgeons were asked to provide evaluation of the MIMVS simulator through a questionnaire.
      The questionnaire used a 1- to 5-point Likert-scale to assess the level of agreement to 6 statements. The first statements addressed the look and feeling of the disposable, silicone mitral valve, whether the relation of the mitral valve to the thoracic torso was realistic, and if performing of sutures felt realistic. The last 2 statements assessed whether surgeons found the simulator a good method for training of MIMVS and if the surgeon became more aware of the skills required to perform MIMVS.

      Statistics

      Data were analyzed using SPSS 25 (IBM Corp, Armonk, NY). Paired measurements were subject to the Wilcoxon-signed rank test to assess potential differences between measurements. If statistically significant, calibration was required. For calibration, an orthogonal regression analysis was conducted to determine a formula, which may compensate for measurement errors. Following calibration, the Wilcoxon-signed rank test was performed again as a check of rigor for remaining differences. All values were denoted as median and interquartile range. A P value ≤.05 was considered to be statistically significant.

      Results

      A 1:1 high-fidelity minimally invasive mitral valve simulator was created to practice endoscopic and robotic mitral valve surgery (Figure 5). The simulator encompasses close-to-nature silicone mitral valve and papillary muscle models, which provide a true suturing experience and haptic feedback. Moreover, the developed feedback system allowed users to objectively assess their skills and guide their development. The algorithm determined suture depth and width by placing a rectangle around the edge-detected suture, from which the distances between opposite sides were calculated (Figure 4, D). Simulator and CT measurements were performed for a total of 15 sutures, divided over 8 mitral valve models. The median suture depth was 3.00 ± 1.00 and 3.30 ± 1.10 mm. for simulator and CT measurements, respectively. In addition, no statistically significant difference was found (P = .139). Median suture width was 9.00 ± 2.00 and 11.26 ± 2.50 mm. for simulator and CT measurements, respectively. Wilcoxon-signed rank test revealed a statistically significant difference between both measurements (P = .001). Subsequently, a simple orthogonal regression was calculated to predict CT measured width values (ie, true width values) based on width values measured by the simulator. A significant regression equation was found (F[1,13] = 28.120, P < .0001), with an R2 of 0.684. Predicted CT values are equal to 3.49 + 0.89 × (simulator measured width) millimeters. Simulator width measurements were adjusted by this formula. Median adjusted simulator width measurement was 11.48 ± 1.77 mm. Comparing the adjusted with CT measurements, no statistically significant difference was found (P = .865) and calibration was deemed successful. Figure 6 shows simulator and CT width measurements before and after calibration.
      Figure thumbnail gr6
      Figure 6CT and simulator width measurements. A, Before calibration. B, After calibration. CT, Computed tomography.

      Independent Operator Evaluation

      A total of 99 independent surgeons tested the simulator and completed the questionnaire. Twelve were experts in the field of MIMVS, whereas 87 were senior surgeons with variable levels of experience in mitral valve surgery. The statements and their corresponding median ± interquartile range of the 1- to 5-point Likert-scale are reported in Table 2. From this table, it is seen that all surgeons more than agree with all statements.
      Table 2The questionnaire statements, which were scored on a 1- to 5-point Likert scale
      StatementResponse (median ± IQR)
      The mitral valve in the simulator looked realistic.5.00 ± 1.00
      The mitral valve in the simulator felt realistic.4.00 ± 1.00
      The relation of the mitral valve to the thorax was realistic.5.00 ± 1.00
      Performing sutures on the valve felt realistic.4.00 ± 1.00
      The simulator is a good method for training minimally invasive mitral valve repair.5.00 ± 0.00
      I am more aware of the skills needed to perform minimally invasive mitral valve repair.5.00 ± 4.00
      1 = “strongly disagree,” 2 = “disagree,” 3 = “neither disagree nor agree,” 4 = “agree,” and 5 = “strongly agree.” IQR, Interquartile range.

      Discussion

      This study demonstrates the development and validation of a transportable, reusable, and high-fidelity MIMVS simulator on which almost all types of surgical techniques, in both endoscopic and robotic approaches could be practiced (Video 1). To enhance reusability, the simulator is made up of static and replaceable components. Static parts encompass the thoracic model, 3D-printed left ventricle, and feedback system. The latter provides objective, real-time feedback on suture depth and width. The margin of error and mitral valve position can be specified and adjusted in advance to adjust the level of complexity. Replaceable mitral valve and papillary muscles are composed of tissue-mimicking silicone that permits reuse of up to 4 procedures with feedback and dozens of procedures without feedback. Total costs of these models were €90 (±110 US$).
      Figure thumbnail fx2
      Video 1Video showing the high-fidelity simulator as a new standard of training for minimally invasive mitral valve repair. Video available at: https://www.jtcvs.org/article/S0022-5223(18)32513-3/fulltext.
      The simulator may also be used to acquire basic repair skills used in conventional median sternotomy. This is achieved by opening the lid of the thoracic model that covers the simulator's core.
      Simulation-based learning could shorten the typical MIMVS learning curve; however, learning curves may vary markedly among surgeons, subsequently drawing the need for proper monitoring and skill assessment in the initial phase.
      • Holzhey D.M.
      • Seeburger J.
      • Misfeld M.
      • Borger M.A.
      • Mohr F.W.
      Learning minimally invasive mitral valve surgery: a cumulative sum sequential probability analysis of 3895 operations from a single high volume center.
      Our developed simulator may provide a first step to objectify this skill assessment by providing feedback and an overall score on suture placement. Such measurable indicators may in the future also be used to guide trainees or residents toward a goal of ideal suture width and depth, demonstrate proficiency, and maintain certification within the field of MIMVS. The simulator may also improve the level of overall skill in the surgical field. By practicing on the simulator, trainees get exposed and used to the restricted working space, to working with long-shafted instruments, to endoscopic vision, and several other basic skills.
      Despite all these advantages, the field of surgical simulation within cardiothoracic surgery is still quite young, which leaves various challenges to be tackled before full acceptance and implementation can be reached. As commented by Feins,
      • Feins R.H.
      Expert commentary: cardiothoracic surgical simulation.
      simulation will bring a conflict between patient care demands and education to the forefront. Meeting patient care demands is already stressed by restricted work hours and will be even further stressed by the introduction of simulator-based training for residents. As a consequence, adequate funding is required to compensate for this loss of resident patient care services. Another persistent concern within the topic of simulation is the question of who will be supervising and mentoring the learning on a simulator.
      • Feins R.H.
      Expert commentary: cardiothoracic surgical simulation.
      The simulator is not able to provide feedback on correctness of suture positioning and can only provide information about its depth and width. Consequently, students or residents should first be taught on the optimal suture positioning, followed by hands-on simulator practice under expert supervision, who can provide a frame of reference. The simulator can subsequently guide trainees toward the technical goal of placing a suture at any width or depth.
      The authors also developed the process to create patient-specific, silicone mitral valve models from 3D transesophageal echocardiographies. These models can be placed in the simulator for presurgical planning and practice of complex cases. This allows the operating surgeon to choose and test the best strategy for repair.
      • Sardari Nia P.
      • Heuts S.
      • Daemen J.
      • Luyten P.
      • Vainer J.
      • Hoorntje J.
      • et al.
      Preoperative planning with three-dimensional reconstruction of patient's anatomy, rapid prototyping and simulation for endoscopic mitral valve repair.
      Pathologic models can also be used for training of residents and novice surgeons to enhance reproducibility, safety, and effectiveness. It has, however, to be noted that if leaflet resection is performed, they are one-time use only.
      To maintain cohesion among the growing literature on surgical simulation in cardiothoracic surgery, Trehan and colleagues
      • Trehan K.
      • Kemp C.D.
      • Yang S.C.
      Simulation in cardiothoracic surgical training: where do we stand?.
      developed a simulator classification. The presented simulator is categorized as human patient simulator, while it fuses physical components with a computer interface, can include patient variation (mounting patient-specific valves into the simulator), and has assessment and feedback capabilities.
      Simulator measurements of the presented simulator have been calibrated and validated; however, its use for skills training in MIMVS has not been validated yet and should subsequently be the subject of future research. Methods to assess and validate such simulators have not been standardized. However, validation should ideally be performed with a cohort of trainees who lack experience in MIMVS to assess differences in their associated learning curve. This cohort should be divided into those who were and were not exposed to simulator training in addition to traditional training methods. In addition, one may also aim to validate surgical simulation training by comparing the level of skill before and after simulator training, in terms of time needed for correct suture placement, width, depth, etc.
      In conclusion, this novel, portable, reusable, and high-fidelity MIMVS simulator for endoscopic and robotic approaches provides residents and surgeons with a reproducible simulation platform to acquire basic skills, shortens their learning curve, helps them become acquainted to newly introduced techniques, and simulates complex cases. Although simulation-based training intuitively seems to have significant advantages, there is little high-level evidence in cardiothoracic surgery. Future research should subsequently focus to validate this type of surgical training.

      Conflict of Interest Statement

      Peyman Sardari Nia is the inventor of the simulator that is commercialized by Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands. All other authors have nothing to disclose with regard to commercial support.
      We gratefully acknowledge R. Verhoeven, R. Van Veen, S. Overeem, and J. Riddenhof from the Technical Medicine of University Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands for their contribution to the development of the first prototype in 2013. We also gratefully acknowledge Instrument Development, Engineering & Evaluation (IDEE), Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands for their technical support for final design in 2014.

      Supplementary Data

      References

        • Shuhaiber J.
        • Anderson R.J.
        Meta-analysis of clinical outcomes following surgical mitral valve repair or replacement.
        Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 2007; 31: 267-275
        • Galloway A.
        • Colvin S.
        • Baumann F.
        • Grossi E.
        • Ribakove G.
        • Harty S.
        • et al.
        A comparison of mitral valve reconstruction with mitral valve replacement: intermediate-term results.
        Ann Thorac Surg. 1989; 47: 655-662
        • Bolling S.F.
        • Li S.
        • O'brien S.M.
        • Brennan J.M.
        • Prager R.L.
        • Gammie J.S.
        Predictors of mitral valve repair: clinical and surgeon factors.
        Ann Thorac Surg. 2010; 90: 1904-1912
        • Holzhey D.M.
        • Seeburger J.
        • Misfeld M.
        • Borger M.A.
        • Mohr F.W.
        Learning minimally invasive mitral valve surgery: a cumulative sum sequential probability analysis of 3895 operations from a single high volume center.
        Circulation. 2013; 128: 483-491
        • Aggarwal R.
        • Ward J.
        • Balasundaram I.
        • Sains P.
        • Athanasiou T.
        • Darzi A.
        Proving the effectiveness of virtual reality simulation for training in laparoscopic surgery.
        Ann Surg. 2007; 246: 771-779
        • Carpenter A.J.
        • Yang S.C.
        • Uhlig P.N.
        • Colson Y.L.
        Envisioning simulation in the future of thoracic surgical education.
        J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2008; 135: 477-484
        • Hicks G.L.
        • Brown J.W.
        • Calhoon J.H.
        • Merrill W.H.
        You never know unless you try.
        J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2008; 136: 814-815
        • Feins R.H.
        Expert commentary: cardiothoracic surgical simulation.
        J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2008; 135: 485-486
        • Dawe S.R.
        • Windsor J.A.
        • Broeders J.A.
        • Cregan P.C.
        • Hewett P.J.
        • Maddern G.J.
        A systematic review of surgical skills transfer after simulation-based training: laparoscopic cholecystectomy and endoscopy.
        Ann Surg. 2014; 259: 236-248
        • Sturm L.P.
        • Windsor J.A.
        • Cosman P.H.
        • Cregan P.
        • Hewett P.J.
        • Maddern G.J.
        A systematic review of skills transfer after surgical simulation training.
        Ann Surg. 2008; 248: 166-179
        • Joyce D.L.
        • Dhillon T.S.
        • Caffarelli A.D.
        • Joyce D.D.
        • Tsirigotis D.N.
        • Burdon T.A.
        • et al.
        Simulation and skills training in mitral valve surgery.
        J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2011; 141: 107-112
        • Verberkmoes N.J.
        • Verberkmoes-Broeders E.M.P.C.
        A novel low-fidelity simulator for both mitral valve and tricuspid valve surgery: the surgical skills trainer for classic open and minimally invasive techniques.
        Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg. 2013; 16: 97-101
        • Hossien A.
        Low-fidelity simulation of mitral valve surgery: simple and effective trainer.
        J Surg Educ. 2015; 72: 904-909
        • Greenhouse D.G.
        • Grossi E.A.
        • Dellis S.
        • Park J.
        • Yaffee D.W.
        • DeAnda Jr., A.
        • et al.
        Assessment of a mitral valve replacement skills trainer: a simplified, low-cost approach.
        J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2013; 145: 54-59.e1
        • The Chamberlain Group
        New Mitral Valve Prolapse Trainer.
        (Available at:)
        • Khabbaz K.R.
        • Mahmood F.
        • Shakil O.
        • Warraich H.J.
        • Gorman J.H.
        • Gorman R.C.
        • et al.
        Dynamic 3-dimensional echocardiographic assessment of mitral annular geometry in patients with functional mitral regurgitation.
        Ann Thorac Surg. 2013; 95: 105-110
        • Maceira A.M.
        • Cosín-Sales J.
        • Roughton M.
        • Prasad S.K.
        • Pennell D.J.
        Reference left atrial dimensions and volumes by steady state free precession cardiovascular magnetic resonance.
        J Cardiovasc Magn Reson. 2010; 12: 65
        • Lam J.
        • Ranganathan N.
        • Wigle E.
        • Silver M.
        Morphology of the human mitral valve: I. Chordae tendineae: a new classification.
        Circulation. 1970; 41: 449-458
        • Ryan L.P.
        • Jackson B.M.
        • Enomoto Y.
        • Parish L.
        • Plappert T.J.
        • John-Sutton M.G.S.
        • et al.
        Description of regional mitral annular nonplanarity in healthy human subjects: a novel methodology.
        J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2007; 134: 644-648
        • Sardari Nia P.
        • Heuts S.
        • Daemen J.
        • Luyten P.
        • Vainer J.
        • Hoorntje J.
        • et al.
        Preoperative planning with three-dimensional reconstruction of patient's anatomy, rapid prototyping and simulation for endoscopic mitral valve repair.
        Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg. 2016; 24: 163-168
        • Trehan K.
        • Kemp C.D.
        • Yang S.C.
        Simulation in cardiothoracic surgical training: where do we stand?.
        J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2014; 147: 18-24

      Linked Article

      • Commentary: See 1—simulate 10,000—do 1; teach 1
        The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular SurgeryVol. 157Issue 4
        • Preview
          “Psychologists tell us that in order to learn from experience, two ingredients are necessary: frequent practice and immediate feedback.” — Richard H. Thaler, 2017 Nobel Laureate in Economics1
        • Full-Text
        • PDF
        Open Archive
      • Commentary: Have mitral valve simulators made it to reality?
        The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular SurgeryVol. 157Issue 4
        • Preview
          The past decade has seen tremendous growth in the role of simulation in cardiothoracic surgery training. Simulators may have a role in teaching and shortening the learning curve associated with complex cardiothoracic procedures.1 In parallel, minimally invasive mitral valve surgery (MIMVS) is increasingly accepted as a feasible and efficacious approach for patients with mitral valve disease. What has been lacking, especially in the field of MIMVS, is a high-fidelity simulator that provides objective feedback on components of the operation.
        • Full-Text
        • PDF
        Open Archive